Shoegaze and Post-Punk Collide in Thrushes’ Sun Come Undone

It’s awe-inspiring to see a sweet and angelic voice paired with the rough and aggressive sound of guitars, percussion, and bass. Baltimore-based band Thrushes pulls this off flawlessly, combining elements of shoegaze, post-punk, and alternative rock into a musical atmosphere that is both memorable and vibrant.

Formed in 2005 by guitarist Casey Harvey and bassist Rachel Tracy, Thrushes quickly recruited vocalist Anna Conner and drummer Matt Davis, all of whom had extensive experience in the Baltimore music scene. Their shared passion for Phil Spector’s production techniques and a love for bands like My Bloody Valentine and Ride helped shape their sound and influence their stylistic approach.

Thrushes’ music is characterized by their incorporation of shoegaze and post-punk, which can be heard in the active instrumentation and vaguely infused melodies of their songs. Vocalist Anna Conner’s light and celestial vocals float over a dense attack of deafening guitars and insatiable production. Their full-length debut, Sun Come Undone, was released to glowing reviews and admirable comparisons.

The album contains eleven songs that showcase the band’s proficiency in their expertise. The melodies may sound fuzzy or drained, but that is simply due to the number of complementary distortion effects on Casey Harvey’s guitar or the lively rhythmic patterns of Rachel Tracy and Matt Davis. Despite the busy production, Thrushes’ musical presentation is delightfully respondent, making the effort and time spent worthwhile.

The album’s opening track, “Aidan Quinn,” sets the standard for Thrushes’ structural tendencies and consistent patterns, with an initial burst of guitar-oriented energy that gradually builds up, exploding into an even more focused and booming portrayal than their initial bearings. “Heartbeats” follows a similar formula, starting with an initial consistent array of drums and eventually dwelling on intensified guitar layers complemented by Conner’s vocals.

Other highlights include the exotic percussive-enabled “Ghost Train” and “The Hardest Part,” which reeks of Jesus and Mary Chain influence. For those who enjoy direct alternative rock focused on shoegaze and vocal post-rock, Sun Come Undone is a commendable debut from this tireless Baltimore four-piece.

Thrushes’ ability to combine the angelic and the aggressive makes them a standout band in the Baltimore music scene. Their unique sound, influenced by the genres of shoegaze, post-punk, and alternative rock, offers a refreshing and memorable listening experience. With Sun Come Undone, Thrushes has cemented their place in the contemporary music scene and given us a glimpse of their promising future.

Author

  • Hellen Meyer

    Meet Hellen Meyer, a music industry aficionado, indie artist advocate, and cookie connoisseur. When she's not listening to new tracks, she's in the kitchen whipping up a batch of delicious treats or hitting up thrift stores for unique fashion finds. As a passionate traveler, she explores the world's cultures and their musical traditions. But Hellen's commitment to sustainability also shines through, as she strives to make eco-conscious choices in all aspects of her life. Follow her articles to discover the latest on independent music and gain insight on how to make the world a better place, one note at a time.

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